Posts Tagged ‘T. B. Smith’

New Publishing Company for Law Enforcement Authors

March 23, 2017

MEDIA RELEASE
For Immediate Release
Contact: Timothy B. Smith—Email: submissions@copworldpress.com; Phone: 541-887-9421

**New Oregon Publishing House to Feature Law Enforcement Authors**

[Ashland, Or] CopWorld Press is a new, independent publishing company dedicated to helping authors with a connection to law enforcement tell their stories. Its books will feature true crime, mystery fiction, police procedurals, personal memoirs and other genres dealing with cops, crime and/or the “day-to-day experiences of the men and women who so bravely serve our communities and citizens.”

Company founder Tim Smith (who writes under the name of T.B. Smith) is a retired police lieutenant from San Diego, Ca, with 27 years of policing experience. In 1984, Pantheon Press published a non-fiction book by British author James McClure called “Cop World: Inside an American Police Force.” McClure utilized the ride-along format to chronicle the  experiences of the San Diego Police Department’s Central Division officers as
part of a broader look at American policing. Smith was one of the officers chronicled under the pseudonym of Luke Jones. Mr. Smith has since written two police procedural novels (The Sticking Place and A Fellow of Infinite Jest, published by Hellgate Press) that feature a Shakespeare quoting cop who uses the name Luke Jones, the name that James McClure gave Smith.”

“Cop World was a look at stories about police as witnessed by and told to an expert author,” says Smith. “But spend an hour or two at the corner bar with a few cops and you’ll soon find they’re the best story tellers on the planet. With that in mind, I formed CopWorld Press, which will work exclusively with law enforcement authors in partnership with my former publisher at Hellgate Press.”

Joining T.B. Smith in the venture is Harley Patrick, owner of L&R Publishing, an Ashland-based company that published Mr. Smith’s first two books under its Hellgate Press imprint (www.hellgatepress.com). Hellgate Press was founded in 1997 and publishes books on military and regional history, veteran memoirs, travel adventure and
historical/adventure fiction. L&R Publishing also publishes children’s books under its Paloma Books imprint (www.palomabooks.com). After receiving a master’s degree in 2000 from the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism, Patrick went to work as an editor at Hellgate Press. In 2007 he purchased the Medford-based company and moved it to Ashland where it has grown to become one of the leading publishers of military history books in the country.

“Law enforcement professionals have such amazing stories to tell,” says Patrick, “and Tim and I are committed to helping them do just that, as well as assisting them in navigating the sometimes complex world of mainstream publishing and distribution.”
For more information, or to submit an author query, visit the CopWorld Press website at
http://www.copworldpress.com.
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More Police Procedural Writer’s Questions Answered

August 13, 2016

Here’s a second round of questions from a writer seeking advice about police policies and procedures for a book she’s writing. I’m including the Q&A in a blog so that other writers tackling police issues can benefit from the information. My answers are in bold.

Q.  I have a couple more questions. Can my rookie cop have the same partner after she completes her probation period?

A.  Here’s where things get a little complicated. This may depend upon the size, and or, policies of the department. First, it’s important to point out that there’s a difference between a rookie and a trainee. If she’s a trainee, it’s likely the department would like her to work alone or with a different partner than her training officer upon graduating from the training program. However, that’s not set in stone. If she’s a rookie who’s on probation, then it’s probable there wouldn’t be any problem with her continuing to work with the same partner when her probationary period ends.

Q.  And what is the chain of command? I have her having a Sergeant as well as the Captain. But I watched Southland and they referred to the Watch Commander as the boss, and the rookie had to be assigned a different partner after graduation.

A. This situation is also more complicated than it appears at first glance. The chain of command is likely to differ depending upon the size of the department. If it’s a large department, then the rank structure is likely to be officer, sergeant, lieutenant, then captain. Ranks above captain are likely to vary depending upon the individual policies of the department.

The watch commander position is actually outside of the normal chain of command. He or she is likely to be the ranking officer in charge of the patrol functions of a specific shift. They may also be responsible for approving bookings to verify that the arresting officer has met all of the standards of probable cause, department policy etc.

If you’re a writer with questions regarding police issues, feel free to send them along. I’ll respond and turn the exchange into a blog for the benefit of others.                                                     ~T.B.  Smith 

 

May 14 Book Signing in San Diego

May 8, 2016

For immediate release

Contact: Nicole Sours Larson 858-274-6160; nsours.larson@gmail.com

T.B. Smith, Author of Luke Jones Novels, to speak at San Diego Chapter of Sisters in Crime May 14.

Partners in Crime, the newly reestablished San Diego chapter of the national organization Sisters in Crime, will welcome T. B. Smith, retired San Diego Police Department lieutenant and author of the Luke Jones cop novels, as speaker at their second meeting to be held on Saturday, May 14. He will have copies of his novels available for purchase and signing. His subject will be Understanding the police: why authors, movies and television shows nearly always get it wrong and what to do about it. (Please see his bio below.)The chapter will meet from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.at San Diego Writers Ink, 2730 Historic Decatur Rd., Suite 202 (located above the Women’s Museum) in Liberty Station, Point Loma.

Sisters in Crime is a national organization with local chapters which supports mystery and crime writers and promotes reading the genre. We are authors, readers, publishers, agents, booksellers and librarians bound by our affection for the mystery genre and our support of women who write mysteries. We are open for everyone’s participation.

Each meeting will feature a short reading from a recently published or soon-to-be-published novel followed by a presentation by a mystery or crime writer or knowledgeable professional in a field of interest to mystery writers and readers. San Diego chapter meetings are held on the second Saturday of the month, starting with a social period with refreshments, followed by a brief membership meeting.

Attendance is free for members and $5 for non-members, which may be applied to membership. Dues are $25 per year, plus membership in the national organization. Members may join at our meeting, with payment by check, cash or credit card, or online athttp://www.sistersincrimesd.org.

Please let us know you’re planning to attend — but drop-ins welcome, too! Please RSVP to SDPartnersinCrime@gmail.com.

T.B. Smith, a former police lieutenant, joined the San Diego Police Department in 1978. He began his second career as an author while recovering from a car accident that forced him to retire from law enforcement.

During his police career, Mr. Smith gained extensive experience as a trainer, teacher, and public speaker. He worked as one of two teaching specialists responsible for the ongoing training of a police department with 1800 members. He’s also taught traffic school and lectured at the University of Southern California’s Delinquency Control Institute. Mr. Smith has spoken to dozens of business and community groups as a Community Relations Officer in the Historic Gaslamp Quarter and is a founding member and former vice president of the SDPD’s Toastmasters Club in addition to being former vice president of the San Diego City Schools Police Officers’ Association.

Mr. Smith’s radio interviews about police use of deadly force have aired in such cities as San Diego, Los Angeles, Denver, Washington D.C., Dallas, and New York. His academic achievements include being both class president and honor graduate of the 107th Delinquency Control Institute at the University of Southern California where he subsequently joined the faculty. He majored in Literature and Creative Writing at San Diego State University.

Mr. Smith lives in Ashland, Oregon, where he enjoys attending the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

In the Rodney King Case, Police Have Taken a Beating,Too.

June 2, 2012

In cleaning out my files recently, I found a couple previously published articles on the Rodney King incident. What follows is an updated version of my opinion piece that appeared in the April, 1991 edition of the San Diego Union-Tribune under the headline, “In the Rodney King Case, Police Have Taken a Beating, Too” with input from my writing partner, Linda A. Shubeck.

The physical damage the police inflicted on Rodney King most likely healed long ago. Healing the damage to relations between cops and the public they serve took a lot longer and is still on the mend.

Many things have changed since 1991, when a bystander serendipitously armed with a camera videotaped Rodney King’s drubbing. Most police cars now carry video cameras and some officers wear head cameras and microphones. Cell phone communications and their ever present cameras add to the levels of public scrutiny.

However, two things remain immutable; the physical and mental reactions of cops who chase scofflaws at speeds exceeding a hundred-miles-per-hour, and the fact that it’s the offenders, not the cops who start police pursuits.

Cops get angry when lives are needlessly jeopardized by the stupid actions of thoughtless people. This anger is magnified by the adrenaline rushing through their bodies as they careen through the streets and along the freeways of urban areas, wondering all the while if the risk is worth the potential cost.

The rush of adrenaline dilates their air passages and pushes elevated levels of oxygen into their lungs. Blood vessels constrict throughout their bodies, redirecting the blood toward their hearts, lungs, and major muscle groups. Their body’s systems react to the adrenaline and other hormones within seconds, giving the officers a nearly instant physical boost of strength as their respiration and awareness of immediate surroundings heighten and brain chemicals make them slightly dizzy.

That’s a partial description of the “fight or flight syndrome” that affects an officer’s physiological state during a pursuit and informs their actions during the arrest. Exercising their best judgment under those circumstances is certainly not easy.

We don’t know what happened between the time when King finally yielded to the police sirens and the videotape rolled. Today we probably would have the entire incident on video. However, we do know that King was shot with a Taser, an apparatus that propels two barbs attached to the ends of wires and delivers 50,000 volts of electrical current, immobilizing almost everyone it strikes. It didn’t immobilize Rodney King. Even with several officers present, the fact that King wasn’t subdued created fear. Add physiologically agitated bodies to fear and frustration and the sum is violence.

What frustration? There’s the frustration of the chase itself and there’s the frustration of policing our society. There’s too little room in our jails and prisons, limited facilities for housing violent or helpless mental health patients and more and more homeless people pepper the streets and sidewalks.  These problems get worse decade by decade.

Maintaining the balance of justice in a free society is an arduous process. We need to recognize that cops are victims of the chaos as well. They police the streets of a degenerating society on a daily basis while suffering under the diminished public support for decades since the Rodney King beating.

Oddly, 9/11 did a lot to heal the breach of trust when the country saw just who runs into a building that’s under attack when nearly everyone else runs in the opposite direction. And today, ubiquitous video cameras can continue to repair police/community relations. Recently, a Philadelphia police officer’s violent encounter with a street crook drew almost universal praise from media pundits in awe of the bravery and mental focus it took to retain his gun during the life-and-death encounter.

It does seem a little odd that today’s proliferation of video cameras can help grant the heart-felt request Rodney King made during the riots following the first trial of the officers involved in his post-chase arrest, “can we all get along?”

A Request from SDPD Captain Miguel Rosario

February 28, 2011

I toyed for a while with the notion of writing a tribute to the recently deceased R. D. Brown for this blog. But I kept remembering the funeral eulogy delivered by SDPD Captain Miguel Rosario. Those remembrances focused me on the few sure things I’ve learned as a writer. You don’t tug on Superman’s cape; you don’t slather your prose with excessive adjectives, and you don’t try to improve on perfection. Miguel Rosario’s eulogy was the perfect tribute to R. D. Brown and he’s consented to guest post it here. Look for it this Thursday, March 3.

Miguel also sent along a request that I’ve copied below.

T.B. I am in the process of creating a collection of RD stories to
include in a small book I am putting together for his family. The
book will include some pictures of RD, photo the day he was hired in
1968, a number of official SDPD ID cards I found in his personnel
file with some classic RD head shots and a few other pictures when he
worked undercover. I wanted to have a story for each page that
featured a picture.

Can you forward me the stories as they come in and maybe even let
people know that I am asking for some great stories that are clean.

Thank you in advance
Miguel

I’m forwarding to Miguel the stories I’ve received and posted on this blog. You can send your stories to him at mrosario@pd.sandiego.gov

Signing for “The Sticking Place”

December 12, 2010

My next signing for “The Sticking Place” will be held at Rex Downing & Associates/Ascent Realtors on Friday, December 17, beginning at 5:00 p.m. It’s located at 4134 Adams Avenue, Suite 105. Look for it across the street from the Kensington branch library. Get your signed copy of the first edition before it runs out! The official release isn’t scheduled until March 1, but over half of the first printing has been sold.